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Carl Zeiss

Background

We first started working with ZEISS in Spring 2019 when we were asked to create a series of videos for their internal communications.

Fast forward to Summer 2020 and we were approached by ZEISS once again, this time to create a video campaign to promote their lens wipes. Zeiss Lens Wipes are pre-moistened wipes specifically designed for cleaning eyeglass lenses.

Execution

For this campaign, the focus was put on the use of ZEISS Lens Wipes in relation to eyeglasses, as ZEISS were keen to really hit home with the message that using miscellaneous materials — such as t-shirts and tissues — to clean eyeglass lenses can result in irreparable damage.

When concepting for this campaign, it became clear to us that whilst we were all aware that we definitely shouldn’t be using improper materials to wipe our glasses, we were all guilty of doing it. This admission of guilt was where the hook ‘it’s time to change the habit’ was born from.

COVID-19 presented its own difficulties and challenges. It was Masters Allen’s responsibility to make sure we were following coronavirus guidelines set by the government.

Firstly, we put together a COVID-19 policy; this policy enforced safe practice for all actors, partners, and crew members. We supplied the appropriate personal protective equipment such as masks and hand sanitiser.

We also adapted our working practises, for instance, there was a requirement to minimise the number of touched items and objects handled by multiple person, with this in mind we had to make adaptations to Art direction whilst filming, and the covid-19 marshall from Masters Allen, ensured safe working practices throughout the day.

Results

‘It’s time to change the habit’ acknowledges that most people are using the ‘wrong’ kinds of materials to clean their lenses and aims to challenge this by educating them about the risks in doing so. The video campaign starts with a montage of clips showing people cleaning their lenses with ‘wrong’ materials (tissues, cloths, t-shirts).

The camera then zooms into a t-shirt at microscopic level to reveal the debris, dirt and grime that can be harboured on the material and ultimately contributes to the lens damage seen in the next frame. The video then goes on to show the lenses being tested in a lab environment.